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Bank Fee Practices By State

State Bans ATM Overdrafts Bans Point-of-sale Overdrafts Bans Transaction Reordering
National Average 3% 17% 20%
Alabama 0% 0% 22%
Alaska 0% 0% 0%
Arizona 0% 18% 11%
Arkansas 0% 43% 51%
California 11% 31% 31%
Colorado 0% 0% 35%
Connecticut 3% 26% 4%
Delaware 3% 9% 5%
Florida 2% 22% 22%
Georgia 0% 18% 15%
Hawaii 0% 0% 100%
Idaho 0% 7% 45%
Illinois 5% 17% 17%
Indiana 0% 1% 4%
Iowa 0% 6% 63%
Kansas 0% 32% 43%
Kentucky 0% 0% 41%
Louisiana 0% 0% 0%
Maine 0% 22% 0%
Maryland 2% 21% 20%
Massachusetts 4% 31% 4%
Michigan 0% 15% 0%
Minnesota 0% 0% 41%
Mississippi 0% 0% 0%
Missouri 0% 22% 44%
Montana 0% 0% 36%
Nebraska 0% 0% 69%
Nevada 8% 28% 36%
New Hampshire 0% 15% 0%
New Jersey 2% 20% 4%
New Mexico 0% 20% 26%
New York 9% 22% 18%
North Carolina 0% 14% 27%
North Dakota 0% 0% 59%
Ohio 0% 0% 18%
Oklahoma 0% 42% 20%
Oregon 0% 13% 36%
Pennsylvania 1% 6% 11%
Rhode Island 0% 23% 0%
South Carolina 0% 20% 22%
South Dakota 2% 2% 37%
Tennessee 0% 13% 24%
Texas 4% 20% 9%
Utah 0% 0% 45%
Vermont 0% 0% 0%
Virginia 1% 15% 30%
Washington 0% 22% 20%
Washington, DC 9% 27% 17%
West Virginia 0% 0% 63%
Wisconsin 0% 0% 63%
Wyoming 0% 0% 60%

Source: Pew Charitable Trusts, “Checks and Balances: Bank Practices in the States”

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Bad Boy Nominee: Brian Moynihan

Bad Boy Nominee: Brian MoynihanBiography: Moynihan has served as CEO of Bank of America since 2010.

Why he’s a contender: He helped fuel a populist revolt against big banks in 2011 after he approved a $5 monthly fee that customers who used their debit cards would be charged.

Following a wave of criticism — and the creation of Bank Transfer Day — Moynihan and his bank backed off, but not before whining that Bank of America has a “right to make a profit.”

What his firm did: The bank made one of the worst acquisitions ever when it purchased Countrywide Financial in 2008 (before Moynihan was named CEO). Countywide financed many of the nation’s mortgages and was a leading subprime lender.

When those loans soured, Bank of America lost billions. The bank then received billions in federal bailout money during the recession.

Recovering from this blunder, Bank of America has cut jobs, made checking accounts more restrictive and removed ATM machines to save money — making it more difficult for consumers to bank.

Like the other big banks, Bank of America has been the subject of several lawsuits related to its consumer-unfriendly practices.

In 2011, the bank agreed to pay a $410 million settlement that it improperly levied overdraft fees on its debit card customers. The lawsuit claimed the bank processed transactions in the order of highest dollar amount to lowest dollar amount rather than chronologically.

This practice sometimes leads to multiple overdraft charges.

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Bad Boy Nominee: John Stumpf

Bad Boy Nominee: John StumpfBiography: Stumpf has served as CEO of Wells Fargo since 2007.

Why he’s a contender: He was one of the first bank CEOs to publicly suggest customers should be penalized over so-called “swipe fee” restrictions. This new rule limits how much a bank can charge a retailer when a consumer uses a debit card.

Stumpf pledged to levy new fees and restrictions on checking accounts. As a result, it’s now more difficult to find free checking accounts with no strings attached.

What his firm did: One of the nation’s big four banks has earned a reputation for preying on minorities. Earlier this summer, Wells Fargo agreed to a $175 million settlement with the Department of Justice, which accused Wells Fargo of charging African American and Hispanic borrowers higher fees or interest rates on their mortgages than white borrowers with similar credit histories.

The bank earlier settled another discrimination lawsuit after it was accused of pressuring African-American homeowners into refinancing their homes with risky high-interest, high fee mortgages.

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Bad Boy Nominee: Jamie Dimon

Bad Boy Nominee: Jamie DimonBiography: Dimon has served as CEO of JPMorgan Chase since 2005. During his tenure, Chase has become the biggest U.S. bank by assets.

Why he’s a contender: New York Times columnist Paul Krugman calls Dimon “the point man in Wall Street’s fight to delay, water down and/or repeal financial reform.”

Dimon has been a loud critic of the Volcker Rule, a complex set of banking reforms that would limit risk-taking by U.S. banks. Primarily, it would forbid banks from investing in private equity or hedge funds.

What his firm did: JPMorgan Chase announced this year it had lost billions of dollars in hedge fund trades. The final loss isn’t known, yet as of mid-July the bank was expected to take a $1.7 billion tax write off for the losses, according to CNN Money.

“Like any loss, banks are allowed to use trading blunders to offset taxable profits elsewhere in the bank,” senior editor Stephen Gandel wrote.

Chase took bailout money even though Dimon claimed all along that it didn’t need it. It was the first of the big banks to repay the money to the government.

The bank has been the target of several lawsuits alleging it has ripped-off its customers.

In June, Chase agreed to pay $100 million to settle a lawsuit that accused the bank of improperly increasing minimum credit card payments to generate more fees.

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Bad Boy Nominee: Lloyd Blankfein

Lloyd Blankfein is the CEO of Goldman Sachs.Biography: Blankfein has served as CEO and chairman of the Wall Street investment firm Goldman Sachs since 2006. He took over for Henry Paulson, who left the firm to serve as U.S. Treasury secretary.

Why he’s a contender: One of Forbes Magazine’s “Most Outrageous CEOs,” he once famously answered a reporter’s question about Wall Street compensation by saying he’s “doing God’s work.”

What his firm did: Goldman made huge profits during the subprime mortgage crisis by betting that Americans would default on their home loans.

They did, and his firm made $4 billion.

And yet Goldman also received bailout money from the federal government at the same time it paid huge bonuses to its executives.

The company also has been criticized for betting products it sold its clients would fail.

In July, Goldman settled a lawsuit for $26.6 million that it had misled investors into buying risky mortgage securities.

The firm also faces a number of other lawsuits for its practices related to the meltdown of the mortgage industry.

Rolling Stone journalist Matt Taibbi once called the firm a “vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money.”

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Bad Boy Nominee: Ben Bernanke

Biography: Bernanke was appointed Federal Reserve chairman in 2006. He is serving a second term, which is set to expire in 2014.

Why he’s a contender: Bernanke sat at the head of the Federal Reserve — which is supposed to police the nation’s biggest banks — leading up to the financial crisis largely created by those same banks.

He kept his job anyway after Congress confirmed him for a second term in 2010.

Bernanke consistently has been tone deaf to the struggles of savers.

In defending low savings rates he said: “And so in trying to strengthen the economy we are actually helping savers by making the returns higher as we can see in what’s happened in the stock market, for example.”

What his agency did: The Federal Reserve has artificially suppressed interest rates for years — and promises to do so for years to come — in an effort to spur lending. In response, banks have made it more difficult for consumers to get credit and are sitting on more than a trillion dollars of money that could be lent but isn’t.

Since 2008, the average 5-year CD rate has fallen from 3.13% APY to 1.06% APY as a result of the policies Bernanke and the other members of the Federal Reserve’s rate-setting committee have put into place.

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Obama’s Proposed Budget May Not Have The Tax Effect You Were Anticipating

For all the clamor and criticism over the proposed tax increases included in President Barack Obama’s 2013 fiscal year budget, there is likely to be little or no effect on federal tax payments made by many of the millions of Americans who earn between $200,000 and $1 million annually.

This is especially true for those who live in or near major cities, and already pay high state and local taxes. Click here to read more

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Profile: Nexity Bank

Nexity Bank is making a fresh start with some of the best CD rates in the country.

That’s unusual for a bank that’s been seized and sold by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

Most new owners want to cut the interest rates savers are being paid.

Nexity Bank is making a fresh start with some of the best CD rates in the country.

But Nexity’s new leaders want to grow the online bank based in Birmingham, Ala., and are out to attract more deposits from savers nationwide.

Here’s where to find Nexity’s latest CD rate sheet.

The bank’s early withdrawal penalties are more lenient than average – one month worth of interest for CDs of 12 months or less, and three months worth of interest for longer CDs. Click here to read more

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Profile: California First National Bank

California First National Bank, more commonly known as CalFirst Bank, is headquartered in Irvine, Calif.

But you won’t find any CalFirst branches there, or anywhere else for that matter. It’s strictly an online bank, with all transactions handled by phone or through its website.

Savers like CalFirst because of the above-average returns it offers on money market accounts and certificates of deposit.

You’ll need at least $5,000 to open a money market account and must maintain a minimum balance of $5,000 in CalFirst accounts to avoid a $20 monthly fee.

CD terms range from 3 months to 3 years. The early-withdrawal penalty is 90 days of interest for terms of one year or less and 180 days of interest for longer CDs. A minimum deposit of $5,000 is required to buy a CD ($2,000 for an IRA CD).

You can open an account from anywhere in the country and fund it through an electronic transfer or by check with a mail-in application.

Deposits of up to $250,000 are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

CalFirst can offer above-average rates because it has a rather unique way of putting your savings to work. Click here to read more

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Profile: Aurora Bank

Aurora Bank is based in Wilmington, Del., with a single branch in Jersey City, N.J.

Aurora Bank is the former Lehman Brothers Bank.Savers like Aurora because it often offers above-average returns on certificates of deposit with terms ranging from 6 months to 5 years and a $1,000 minimum deposit.

Click here to see Aurora’s latest CD rates.

You can apply for accounts online from anywhere in the country and fund them with an electronic transfer or by check with a mail-in application.

Deposits up to $250,000 are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Click here to read more

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Profile: Salem Five Savings Bank

Founded in 1855, Salem Five Cents Savings Bank is headquartered in Salem, Mass., just north of Boston.

The unusual name comes from the bank’s earliest days, when it was known as the Nickel Bank because it took five-cent deposits.

Salem Five currently offers a wide array of consumer and business loans, deposit accounts and insurance policies.

Its rates on certificates of deposits are consistently above the national average, with minimum deposits ranging from $500 to $10,000.

Click here to see Salem Five’s latest CD rates.

Accounts can be opened online or by printing out and mailing in an application form.

Deposits can made through electronic transfers or by sending a check with mail-in applications.
Click here to read more

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Profile: Colorado Federal Savings Bank

Colorado Federal Savings Bank is an FDIC-insured online bank based in Greenwood Village, Colo.

It’s a pretty simple operation that offers certificates of deposit and savings accounts along with fixed- and variable-rate mortgages.

It operates with fewer than 30 employees serving 185,000 deposit accounts that hold just under $600 million.

It usually offers competitive returns on CDs ranging from 6 months to 5 years, with a $5,000 minimum deposit. Click here to see Colorado Federal’s latest CD rates.

Savings accounts feature no monthly maintenance fees and free ACH transfers with no daily limit amounts. Click here to find Colorado Federal’s latest savings rates.

The downsides are that you must fund accounts through an ACH (automated clearing house) transfer — Colorado Federal won’t process paper checks.

Click here to read more

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Profile: Melrose Credit Union

Melrose Credit Union consistently offers some of the top nationally available CD rates.

Click here to see its latest rate sheet.

Melrose can do that because it’s developed a lucrative business putting those deposits to work financing New York cabs.

Not the actual cars, but the municipal licenses that those taxis must have to pick passengers up on city streets.

Those licenses are the 6-inch aluminum medallions that are permanently attached to the hood of all 13,200 legal taxis.

They can be bought and sold through city-approved brokers and currently cost about $575,000 for an individually owned cab and $750,000 for a fleet cab.

Melrose finances more of those purchases than anyone else.
Click here to read more

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Profile: Bank of Internet USA

Bank of Internet USA is a fully insured, publicly traded online bank.

It offers a full line of consumer products, including checking and savings accounts, exclusively over the Internet.Bank of Internet USA offers a full line of consumer products.

It has no bricks-and-mortar branches and fewer than 100 employees working out of a single office in San Diego.

Bank of Internet USA says that by keeping its operating costs down, it can pay customers higher-than-average returns on their savings.

Indeed, it consistently offers some of the best nationally available CD rates. Click here to see Bank of Internet USA’s latest rate sheet.

It uses most of those deposits to make home loans and to finance the purchase of multifamily housing through its Apartment Bank division.

Bank of Internet USA was founded in 1999 by Gary Lewis Evans – one of the true pioneers in online banking.
Click here to read more

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IRA CDs Offer Protection, Complications

I’ve been dealing with IRA CDs for about two years now, learning as I go along.

IRA CDs offer the risk-averse a chance to preserve accumulated retirement nest eggs.

No doubt these accounts represent a good way for the risk-averse, like me, to preserve accumulated retirement nest eggs while realizing a modest return. FDIC insurance, up to $250,000, is available, separate from other personal accounts.

Opening certificates of deposit with existing tax-deferred retirement assets, however, can present complications, primarily because of the paperwork and processing required to transfer funds and to ensure IRS compliance.

When, early in 2009, I scrambled to move my individual retirement account assets from a single T. Rowe Price account to multiple bank IRA CDs, the process proved excruciatingly slow, taking two to three weeks to complete per CD.

I suffered angst over locking in a rate while all the t’s and i’s were duly crossed and dotted.

Some banks, like Bank of America, guarantee a rate for a specified period on IRA transfers; others, like Nationwide Bank, give “soft” assurances to do their best. But many banks make no promises at all.

Now my CDs are maturing, and I’m encountering new complications.
Click here to read more

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Not Your Debt: How To End Collection Calls

This blog post is in response to a question from one of our readers, who apparently lost the phone number lottery after she moved to Virginia.

Put complaint in writing if collectors won't stop calling you for someone else's debt problem

The phone company assigned her a new home telephone number that once belonged to someone on multiple debt collectors’ lists. She and her family received calls from collection agencies all day, every day.

You don’t have to put up with it.

“The one company did call, and I was home to answer the phone,” our reader says. “I explained to the person that the phone number was recycled as of this summer and told her to call Cox (her cable/phone company) if she needed to verify. She was sorry about the mass callings and said she would take care of it.”

Her conversation helped end one company’s calls. Our reader still gets calls from other firms, only she’s usually not home to explain them away.

But she can still clear up her phone line.

Click here to read more

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CD Rates Drop 25% to 40% During 2010

CD rates ended an abysmal year by falling for the 26th straight month in December.

The average return on 3-, 6-, 12- and 24-month CDs declined by about 40% during 2010. The average return on 60-month CDs fell by about 25% over the course of the year.

All five of the certificates of deposit we track reached record lows during December, and four of the five average CD rates were down for the month.

The one exception was for 5-year certificates of deposit, whose average return actually ticked up from 1.51% at the end of November to 1.56% at the end of December.

But we’ve seen blips like this before, and they have not signaled a change in the overall downward trend for all CD rates.

That’s because the Federal Reserve seems determined to hold interest rates at unprecedented lows for the foreseeable future.
Click here to read more

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The Smart Way To Give Stuff Away

A few Saturdays ago, my boyfriend and I did what a lot of people do at the end of the year: pulled a bunch of dusty stuff out of his basement and drove it to Goodwill.

Not only would this keep stuff out of a landfill, but he would take the tax deduction for his 2010 taxes.

Except we didn’t anticipate something: Goodwill won’t take everything, which is how we ended up driving around with an exercise bike and weight bench in the back of my mom’s truck for three hours.

Here’s how to be a little smarter than we were when giving stuff away:

Match your donation with an appropriate charity. Church thrift shops are often a good place to take used clothing. But save furniture or large appliances for charities that make regular swings through your neighborhood with trucks.
Click here to read more

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Warren Lays Out Her Very Good Plans

We didn’t need another reason to love Elizabeth Warren.

But check out this Q&A the White House special adviser for consumer affairs did with Kiplinger Personal Finance. It appears in the magazine’s January 2011 issue.

In it, she lays out her very rational and reasonable goals for the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which she’s helping to establish and which should open for business in July.

As usual, Warren doesn’t mince words when discussing the shady tactics of credit card and mortgage companies.

It’s no wonder all of those Republican lawmakers who are in the pocket of the banking industry tried to block creation of the new consumer protection bureau, which was Warren’s idea, and have vowed to fight any effort to make Warren its first director.

She’s a woman who can speak truth to power — and power doesn’t like it.
Click here to read more

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CD Rates Enter 3rd Year Of Steady Decline

CD rates fell for the 25th straight month in November, with no end in sight for the decline.

The average return on four of the five certificates of deposit we track fell and ended the month at record lows.

The one exception was for 3-month CDs, whose average return actually ticked up from 0.21% at the end of October to 0.23% at the end of November.

But we’ve seen blips like this before and they have not signaled a change in the overall downward trend for all CD rates.

With Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke continuing to say the economy isn’t growing fast enough there’s no reason to expect he’ll allow interest rates to rise anytime during 2011 – and maybe not even in 2012.

Bankrate’s final November survey of large banks and thrifts found the average annual yield for a:
Click here to read more

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What If I Don’t Voluntarily Go Away?

A few years ago, Third Federal Savings & Loan in Cleveland was offering one of the best rates in the country on home equity lines of credit – just 3.25% for up to $30,000.

There weren’t a lot of fees, so I signed up.

Since then, I’ve only had to tap the line once, and I paid off the balance in just a few months.

Now I’m receiving letters from the thrift’s Chairman and CEO Marc Stefanski, asking me to “consider closing this line of credit” because I’m not using it.

The letters are very nice and say that “Third Federal is not requiring you to close your home equity line of credit.”

But they seem to be coming every month, in lieu of a statement.

If I don’t heed Third Federal’s request to voluntarily close the account, I have to wonder if the thrift will decide I’m just too dim to get it and cancel my line of credit.

Hundreds of thousands of homeowners have certainly had their home equity lines reduced or canceled over the past few years.

I have to wonder if I’ll be joining them.

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Kardashian Sisters Try To Ditch Debit Card

Confession time.

I have, on occasion, stepped into the lives of the Kardashian sisters.

Famous for doing absolutely nothing except being born into money, Kim, Khloe and Kourtney have devoted their lives to exposing their overspending, bratty drama-filled lives to a series of reality shows on E!.

They’re like one giant, untalented, stiletto-ed train wreck. It’s hard to turn away.

Now TMZ says the girls are trying to wiggle out of one of the worst ideas they’ve ever foisted on their fans – their pre-paid debit MasterCard.

The “Kardashian Kard” charges so many fees that the Connecticut Attorney General is trying to figure out if it violates consumer protection laws and Consumers Union (the publishers of Consumers Report) has issued a special warning about it.

We can certainly see why.
Click here to read more

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Another ‘Real Housewife’ Goes Bankrupt

Surprise, surprise. Another “real housewife” is flat broke.

Teresa Guidice from “Real Housewives of New Jersey” was the first of Bravo’s reality stars to file for bankruptcy.

Now Sonja Morgan, who appears on Bravo’s “Real Housewives of New York City,” is seeking Chapter 11 protection from her $19.8 million in debt.

We could blame Morgan’s outrageous spending habits for her bankruptcy — and that’s certainly a factor — but we see two bigger problems as the root of her fall.

First, she made one of the classic mistakes of investing: She sunk a ton of money into something she didn’t understand.

In this case it was a movie called “Fast Flash to Bang Time” that was supposed to be a star vehicle for John Travolta.
Click here to read more

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Pay More To Pay With Plastic? I Think Not.

I recently had dinner with a few friends at a Turkish restaurant in Philadelphia.

While trying to decipher what exactly what kebab I was ordering, I noticed an odd statement on the menu:

“Credit card processing fees that we have to pay, will be your discount when you pay by CASH! , therefore the prices that we have posted here are reduced CASH prices. (10% will be added to your bill, if you prefer to pay by VISA or MasterCard.)”

I’ve been waiting to see merchants start offering cash discounts, but surcharges?

While retailers can cut your bill for paying in cash, they can’t add to it if you use plastic.

Stores and restaurants pay credit cards an “interchange fee” every time customers charge a purchase, which usually costs the retailer about 2% of every transaction.

“The merchant can offer an incentive for the consumer to pay with cash– thus avoiding the interchange fee — but is not allowed to pass that fee along to the customer,” says Gail Cunningham, spokesperson for National Foundation for Credit Counseling.
Click here to read more

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FDIC Offers Unlimited Coverage For Non-Interest Bearing Accounts In 2011

The FDIC is tweaking its insurance rules to give savers a little extra protection in 2011.

It will provide unlimited deposit insurance coverage to noninterest-bearing transaction accounts.

This means that no matter how much you have in a traditional checking account, or demand deposits accounts that earn no interest, that money is insured should the bank go under.

And banks still are going under – 146 so far this year and counting.

That also means all deposits in non-interest bearing accounts will no longer be counted towards the insurance limit for interest-bearing accounts.

But this change is temporary, running from Dec. 31, 2010 through Dec. 31, 2011.
Click here to read more

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Pirates Of The Caribbean – The Sequel

Have we found the latest in a long line of off-shore bank scams?

A Web site that claims to be a Panama-based “Internet brokerage service” has begun to gain traction with the serach engines, and it’s promising the most eye-popping CD rates we’ve ever seen.

Comexonline says: “We offer online risk-free investment solutions with fixed interest rates from 19.5% to 35.5% APY.”

A photo shows a ritzy office building with Comexonline’s name on it, and there’s supposed to be “representation in the United States,” too.

But that’s just a post office box in Los Angeles and there’s no phone number for customers to call Comexonline’s “investment advisers” in Panama City or California. It can only be reached by email or fax.

Puh-leeze.

I have a terrible feeling that we’ve seen this movie before.
Click here to read more

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Unscrupulous Spam Follows Pay Day Loan

Here’s another way the payday loan industry preys on unsuspecting customers.

It sells their email addresses to unscrupulous scams trying to make a buck off of their financial woes.

We found this out through Heather, an attorney from Philadelphia.

It seems that Harold, a man Heather doesn’t know but who has a similar last name, applied for a payday loan.

But instead of putting his email address on the form, he put Heather’s. (Honest mistake? Deliberate deception? She doesn’t know.)

Not only did she receive a copy of his loan documents, but she’s being inundated with up to 20 emails per day offering to help the cash-strapped Harold.

A surprising number claim they want to loan him even more money.
Click here to read more

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The Secret To Melrose’s Great Rates: Taxis

Who’d have thought Melrose Credit Union could offer some of the best CD rates in the country because it’s developed a lucrative business putting those deposits to work financing New York cabs?

Not the actual cars, but the municipal licenses that those taxis must have to pick passengers up on city streets.

Those licenses are the 6-inch aluminum medallions that are permanently attached to the hood of all 13,200 legal taxis.

They can be bought and sold through city-approved brokers and currently cost about $575,000 for an individually-owned cab and $750,000 for a fleet cab.

Melrose finances more of those purchases than anyone else, marketing director Robert Nemeroff told us when we sat down with him at the credit union’s office in Queens last week.

Here’s how he says Melrose works, why it can offer savers some of the best nationally available CD rates, and what it has planned for the future.
Click here to read more

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Yes Virginia, There Really Is A Melrose Credit Union (And We Went There)

Many of the nation’s biggest banks are based in the glistening skyscrapers of Manhattan.

But to find the little New York credit union that’s offering many of the best CD rates in the country, we had to hop on the E train and venture out to Queens.

There, in the Briarwood neighborhood about 12 miles from Citigroup’s Park Avenue headquarters, we found Melrose Credit Union’s single office.

We’ve written so much about Melrose over the past few months that we felt like we just had to go there to assure ourselves – and you – that it really existed.

We wanted to see what the credit union with the unusual charter that allows anyone in the country to join, regardless of where they live or work, is really like, and find out how it can keep offering such great returns month after month after month.

Melrose holds three of the six spots on our most recent CD Rates Leaderboard. At one point last summer it claimed four of the six, best nationally available CD rates in the country.
Click here to read more

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CD Rates Kept Falling In October

Savers have been taking it on the chin for two years now, as CD rates fell for the 24th straight month in October.

The average return on all five of the certificates of deposit we track fell and ended the month at record lows.

The biggest declines were on longer-term CDs, with the average yield on 5-year CDs falling more than a tenth of a point.

With the Federal Reserve determined to push interest rates even lower, we certainly expect the decline to continue into a third year this month.

Bankrate’s weekly survey of large banks and thrifts taken Oct. 27, found the average annual yield for a:
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