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I Just Can’t Break Up With Mint.com

In December, I wrote that I was souring on Mint.com and signing up for Pageonce.com to see if it was a viable alternative.

Both are online services that track your money for you. They show you balances in bank and investment accounts, and what’s due on credit cards and other debts like your mortgage. They give you an overall picture of where your money is and where it needs to go.

I sought out Pageonce.com because felt that I had grown beyond Mint.com.

I also didn’t like all of the suggestions to refinance my mortgage (nothing more than ads) and warnings that my credit score is out of date (more ads to sell me a credit score service, which no one needs to pay for).

I didn’t feel I needed the budgeting tools that personal finance newbies use on the site.

Pageonce.com, like Mint.com, is free for the basic level and still has ads, but it didn’t have the budgeting clutter, so I gave the site a try.

Four months later, I’ve reached a balance between the two.

I check Mint.com every morning. It had become habit, and one I couldn’t quite transfer to Pageonce.com.

But that doesn’t mean I don’t like having the Pageonce.com service, for two simple reasons.

First, it emails me when I have bills due, and not just credit card bills and the mortgage.

It alerts me when my phone bill, car and health insurance premiums are due, too, which is not an option with Mint.com.

Since I don’t do automatic payments (a result of fluctuating freelance income), it’s nice to have the reminder emails.

This is especially important now that I get very few bills through the traditional mail service. Since I can no longer sort paper bills into piles based on when they need to be paid, I rely more on my online calendar and those Pageonce.com emails.

Pageonce.com also emails every time I’m hit with a finance charge or bank fee. Those emails calculate the total fees I’ve paid on that card or account, too, which is a sobering reminder of money I’m throwing down the drain.

Now, those reminders usually come as part of an ad to change to a 0% APR credit card, for example, in the case where I got dinged on my Chase Sapphire card, or a no-fee bank account.

But, like the ads on Mint.com, I’ve learned to ignore when the advertised product won’t work for me. (I paid off the balance to the Chase Sapphire card, so I don’t need to transfer the balance.)

So, I’ll keep both services for now and continue to ignore the fluff.

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  1. Steve said:
    on April 28th at 11:14 am

    Mint Bill Reminders: https://www.mint.com/how-it-works/bill-reminders/